411homerepair.com

Latest Articles

Tips for Excellent and Cost-Saving Home Repairs and Glass Works

When was the last time you did major repairs to the house you spend most of your days in? You know that prevention is better than cure, right? So,...

on Mar 21, 2017

Top Things You Should Prepare Before a Big Remodeling Project

Starting a home remodeling project is always exciting. You have a new design in mind and you are eager to get the project started. You have a team...

on Mar 16, 2017

How Large can I Build a Structure in my Backyard?

If you are really asking how big you can build without having to worry about permits and paperwork, that is a different issue than having an...

on Mar 16, 2017

How Handyman Services can be Handy

Living in the big city, where everything is on the go, life can get hectic and often times it is your home that may be left neglected over other...

on Mar 16, 2017

Buying Property Near the Beach

What does one look for when buying property? If you want to live in a serene environment away from all the noise and forgot about being right in...

on Mar 13, 2017

Eco-Friendly Building Materials to Consider Before You Remodel

by Guest on Apr 3, 2015

By Jane Blanchard

Are you thinking about remodeling your home but concerned about your potentially large carbon footprint? Of course you'll want to make your house as energy efficient as possible by choosing Energy Star appliances, LED lightbulbs, and the best windows you can afford, but what’s often overlooked in the process is eco-friendly construction materials. Check out the list of sustainable building materials below, and talk to your contractor about which ones might be right for your project.

Exterior Construction

  • Recycled steel beams. If your job involves framing an addition, look into using recycled steel beams instead of traditional lumber. Using recycled steel saves trees and keeps perfectly useful metal out of the landfill. Steel is also a great choice anywhere extra strength is needed.

     

  • Recycled plastic lumber. If you're adding a deck, consider using boards made of recycled plastic instead of wood. This product is much more durable and eliminates the need for chemical coatings for waterproofing, cutting down on future maintenance while saving trees and keeping plastic out of landfills.

     

  • Cellulose insulation. If your project requires insulation, consider using cellulose instead of plastic or fiberglass products. This fluffy, eco-friendly material is typically made of recycled newspaper, which reduces waste and keeps your new addition chemical-free.

     

Interior Fittings

  • Reclaimed wood, brick and stone. Talk to your interior designer or contractor about finding used building materials. Often when buildings are torn down or gutted for a remodel, the materials are salvaged and sold for reuse. It may take some searching, but you can find gorgeous antique floorboards, handmade bricks, and other historic materials to lend some charm and interest to your project. Not only are these materials unique, but this type of recycling is also eco-friendly.

     

  • Bamboo flooring. Consider skipping hardwood floors in favor of bamboo. You can get a similar look, but bamboo is a far more renewable resource than trees because it grows very quickly. Growers can replace a stand of bamboo in just a few years, but it takes decades to replace a forest.

     

  • Salvaged hardware. In addition to reclaimed wood and other building materials, you can browse your local salvage yard for everything from doors to stained-glass windows to antique kitchen cabinetry. Salvage yards and antique dealers are also great places to find glass doorknobs, unique hinges, and antique drawer pulls. It may take some patience and an open mind, but if you love to shop, this is a great option for finding quality materials to salvage and repurpose in your project.

     

  • Low-VOC products. VOCs (volatile organic compounds) emit fumes that can pollute the air and be hazardous to health when those gases are trapped indoors. Formaldehyde is the most well-known VOC, but these chemicals are found in many common construction materials, including paints, wood coatings, and adhesives. Talk to your contractor about replacing traditional products with low-VOC versions whenever possible. If you're doing your own painting, it's easier than ever to find a low- or no-VOC interior paint: just ask the sales associate to point you in the right direction when you bring in your paint chips.

For more tips and tricks, head to Modernize.com.

Author

Guest

Guest

Random Articles

Some Useful Tips To Hire A Water Damage Restoration Specialist

Water damage can hit almost any building anywhere. But, perhaps buildings in areas that are prone to natural disasters may be slightly more...

Hire Contractors / Estimates

Installing Security Roller Shutters

For most people, a home is a sacred thing – a place that houses our most precious belongings and, most importantly, the people we love. Homes need...

Windows / Siding

3 Types of Basket Storage You Can't Live Without

When it comes to organizing your home, you have a lot of different storage options. Everything from crates and barrels to enormous bags and boxes...

Interior Design / Decor

Adding Value to Your Home with Wood Flooring

When you spent months looking for that ideal property, finding somewhere that has the treasure of real wood flooring is exciting. Yet this classic...

Floors / Tile / Hardwood

The Top Five Reasons to Buy a New-Build Home

Purchasing a new home is always a huge event in someone's life and there are many factors to consider. While the price per square foot might be...

Real Estate / Finance

Actions

Contact Us | Submit Article | RSS | 411homerepair © 2017