411homerepair.com

Latest Articles

All About Elastomeric Stucco Painting

Painting stucco can be a daunting task because of its textured surface. As such, executing this uphill task correctly calls for a huge deal of both...

on Feb 19, 2017

Hidden Dangers in Your Home Due to Broken Furnace and AC System

There are hidden risks in your home that could potentially endanger your family. This can be brought about by a damaged HVAC that needs to be...

on Feb 18, 2017

The Hidden Danger of Ignoring Damaged Bricks?

It is a common misconception that the extent of unsightly brick damage is limited to aesthetics. While it is true, brick repairs and tuck pointing...

on Feb 17, 2017

Creating a Strong Home Security Plan

Crime remains a major concern for most homeowners. The reality of becoming a victim is frightening, yet many people don't know what steps are most...

on Feb 16, 2017

4 Tips for Decorating your Studio Apartment

If you live in a small to medium-sized living space, you may need to get creative with decorating. It’s not uncommon to pay a great deal for a...

on Feb 16, 2017

Fall Planting and Gardens - Part 2

by Guest on Apr 30, 2012

Mid-Season Crops

Plant by mid August -- Approximate maturity 60 days. Use any of the dates from above as well as the Best Dates below.

ROOTCROPS

Early Carrots
Leek
Turnip
Kohlrabi

LEAFCROPS

Perennial Flowers
Perennial Herbs
Early Cabbages
Winter Cauliflower
Collards
Swiss Chard

Early Maturing Crops

Plant by mid September -- Approximate maturity 30 days. Use the dates from the previous page as well as the Best Dates below. The latest dates are for warmer climates, later frosts, or protected plantings.

ROOTCROPS

Chives
Bunching Onions
Radishes

LEAFCROPS

Leaf Lettuces
Mustard
Broccoli
Cover Crops
Spinach
Lawn seed

LENGTHENING YOUR GROWING SEASON

Windbreaks and Walls

You can add from 10oF. to 15oF. of warmth to your fall and winter garden by taking advantage of windbreaks and walls. Many gardeners have discovered by surprise that a south-facing wall of the home, shed, or greenhouse is ideally situated for constructing easily built structures that use the free solar energy of the sun.

Cloches

Cloches provide an elevated warm climate around your winter row crops. They can best be described as portable green houses of various designs that work with solar energy to warm the immediate row or plant they are placed over. Many designs have been tried. Ideas range from very stiff wire frames holding glass panes, to clear gallon-size plastic bleach or pop bottles with their bottoms removed.

All cloches have two drawbacks to consider. First, on bright sunny winter days they have to be manually ventilated, to prevent excessive heat build up. Second, poorly constructed or "staked-down" cloches can become kites during winter windstorms.

Cold Frames

Cold frames are permanent structures that considerably lengthen the growing season. They are an excellent way to grow fall and winter crops. Cold frames provide protection from strong winds, elevate the daily and nighttime temperatures around the plants, and protect frost sensitive vegetables or flowers. They are easy to build and the vegetables and flowers in them will require minimal care. In short season areas, a cold frame will allow you to start seed up to 8 weeks earlier than you can outdoors.

You can use an old window sash of any dimension to build a cold frame. Fiberglass or polyethylene can be used if the glass is broken. The ideal cold frame is built about 18 inches at the back and 12 inches at the front. The slope allows rain to run off and affords a better angle for gathering the sun's heat.

Your cold frame should face south for maximum exposure to sunlight. Also select a location with a slight ground slope to provide adequate drainage away from the frame. To provide ventilation, partially open your cold frame during sunny, warm weather. During cold snaps, cover the cold frame with burlap or heavy cloth to provide extra warmth.

Hot Beds are cold frames with a source of bottom heat. Today, that heat comes from electric heating cables. A few hot beds are still constructed using the old method of a layer about a foot and a half thick of decomposing manure beneath the soil of the cold frame as the source of heat. Either way the hot bed remains frost-free during the winter.

Random Articles

3 Reasons Why Avoiding Galvanized Springs is Smart

Beauty shouldn't concern you when your safety is at stake! That's a fact for all things in life and especially when it comes to garage door...

Doors / Garages

Finding the Perfect French Door Refrigerator

Since their introduction, sales of French door refrigerators have steadily increased, becoming one of the most popular types of appliances for new...

Appliance / Repair

Decorating and Furnishing a Small Formal Dining Room

A formal dining room is a valuable addition to any home, even if the dining room is small. It is a separate area from the rest of the home where...

Bedroom / Furnishings

How to Wash More Laundry with Less Energy

 If you are in the business of saving time and effort, then front load washers can help you to do your laundry without using as much water,...

Appliance / Repair

5 Landscaping Tips to Help Avoid Foundation Problems

There are many things that property owners can do to protect their foundations from deterioration, sagging and cracking. Listed below are tips to...

Garden / Landscaping

Actions

Contact Us | Submit Article | RSS | 411homerepair © 2017