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10 Tips To Lowering An Electricity Bill

10 Tips To Lowering An Electricity Bill This lay out 10 different strategies you can do to help drastically lower your electricity bill so that you...

on Apr 23, 2017

Reasons to Hire End of Lease Cleaning Services

You love your apartment, and you have made many great memories there. However, now you must consider what to do as you near the end of your lease....

on Apr 21, 2017

Are Blocked Drains a Landlord's Responsibility?

As a tenant renting a property, you are expected to do any kind of reasonable maintenance work that prevents damage to the property. But what...

on Apr 20, 2017

Smart Upgrades to Get More from Your Home Renovation

If you are planning a home remodeling project, it is the perfect time to consider making a few major upgrades that will make your home more...

on Apr 19, 2017

5 Tips on Growing an Organic Garden

Once seen as something attempted only by health fanatics and bohemian types, organic gardening has taken the world by storm and is one of the...

on Apr 19, 2017

Why do I have Moisture on my Windows?

by Michigan State University on Apr 26, 2012

Your humidistat is set too high if excessive moisture collects on windows and other cold surfaces. Excess humidity for a prolonged time can damage walls especially when outdoor air temperatures are very low. Excess moisture condenses on window glass because the glass is cold. Other sources of excess moisture besides overuse of a humidifier may be long showers, running water for other uses, boiling or steaming in cooking, plants, and drying clothes indoors. A tight, energy efficient house holds more moisture inside; you may need to run a kitchen or bath ventilating fan sometimes, or open a window briefly. Storm windows and caulking around windows keep the interior glass warmer and reduce condensation of moisture there.

Humidifiers are not recommended for use in buildings without proper vapor barriers because of potential damage from moisture buildup. Consult a building contractor to determine the adequacy of the vapor barrier in your house. Use a humidity indicator to measure the relative humidity in your house. The American Society of Heating and Air Conditioning Engineers (ASHRAE) recommends these maximum indoor humidity levels.

Outdoor Recommended Indoor

Temperature Relative Humidity
+20 F. 35%
+10 F 30%
0 F. 25%
-10 F. 20%
-20 F. 15%
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