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What Is The Difference Between A Furnace And A Boiler?

We are sure you already heard about furnaces and boilers but most people have no idea what the differences is between the two. Generally speaking,...

on Dec 9, 2016

Glass Fencing: Finding Balance in the Yard with this Simple Addition

There are so many things to think about when building or remodeling property. Sometimes projects don’t come together like we had planned and...

on Dec 8, 2016

Super Eco Home Improvements to Add Real Value to Your Modern Home

Over the past decade, people have gone from freely using resources to eventually coming to the realization that it is critical to work to conserve...

on Dec 7, 2016

5 Ideas for DIY Decorations for Upcoming Winter Holidays

The holidays are coming up and it is time to think about preparations. Most people associate winter holidays with family, close people, favorite...

on Dec 6, 2016

5 Steps to Getting the Right Roof Replacement for Your Home

Just like other remodeling projects, the cost of replacing your roof could be prohibiting, particularly depending on the size of your home and the...

on Dec 5, 2016

Why do I have Moisture on my Windows?

by Michigan State University on Apr 26, 2012

Your humidistat is set too high if excessive moisture collects on windows and other cold surfaces. Excess humidity for a prolonged time can damage walls especially when outdoor air temperatures are very low. Excess moisture condenses on window glass because the glass is cold. Other sources of excess moisture besides overuse of a humidifier may be long showers, running water for other uses, boiling or steaming in cooking, plants, and drying clothes indoors. A tight, energy efficient house holds more moisture inside; you may need to run a kitchen or bath ventilating fan sometimes, or open a window briefly. Storm windows and caulking around windows keep the interior glass warmer and reduce condensation of moisture there.

Humidifiers are not recommended for use in buildings without proper vapor barriers because of potential damage from moisture buildup. Consult a building contractor to determine the adequacy of the vapor barrier in your house. Use a humidity indicator to measure the relative humidity in your house. The American Society of Heating and Air Conditioning Engineers (ASHRAE) recommends these maximum indoor humidity levels.

Outdoor Recommended Indoor

Temperature Relative Humidity
+20 F. 35%
+10 F 30%
0 F. 25%
-10 F. 20%
-20 F. 15%
Windows / Siding 1223 Views

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