411homerepair.com

Latest Articles

Sandy Soil: The Best Plants to Grow In

The main peculiarities of the sandy soil, its pluses and minuses. Useful tips on how to improve the sandy soil. Examples of the plants that can be...

on Jan 16, 2020

6 Ideas to Help Keep Your House Cool Without High Utility Bills

Keeping the home comfortable is a vital part of homeownership, but not when it begins to drain your finances. Here, we look at a few smart ways you...

on Jan 11, 2020

How to Paint Kitchen Cabinets the Right Way

One of the most common questions homeowners have about DIY home painting projects is how do I repaint my kitchen cabinets? You may be surprised to...

on Jan 10, 2020

Top-Loading Washing Machine DIY Troubleshooting and Repair Guide

What is wrong With your washing machine? Listed here are some common problems that can occur with your top-loading washing machines include It...

on Jan 10, 2020

Refrigerator (Fridge) Troubleshooting and DIY Repair

Ready to get started on DIY troubleshooting and repair you have been thinking about. What is wrong? Follow these tips to find what to look at, and...

on Jan 10, 2020

How To Fix A Leaning Privacy Fence

by Zachary Drumm on Aug 23, 2019

The privacy fence is the holy grail of suburban living. Most families work for years, saving their funds until they can afford a yard with a privacy fence.

Privacy fences are not cheap. Even if you install it yourself, the wood is costly, and the time investment is high, requiring several weekends of work.

The best bet is to buy a home that already has one installed. While privacy fences cost a lot to install and increase the sell ability of a house, they don't add a lot to the home's selling price.

When you buy a house with the fence already installed, the fence comes along as a nearly-free upgrade.

Of course, any existing fence is not going to look as new as the day it was installed. They weather quickly and, depending on the quality of the installation; they may sag or warp.

An easy fix for appearances save is to pressure wash the fence and spray it with a protective stain. This will slow any weathering while providing your fence with a fresh, new, look.

Leaning fences are a common problem for homeowners. In rare cases, high winds have overcome the fence and pushed the fencing over. On the west edge of town, there is a new subdivision that gets the brunt of every storm. There isn't a straight privacy fence in the entire community.

However, most leaning fences are a result of rotted boards or poor concrete.

Here is how you fix it.

Option #1: Use The Existing Support

Ideally, the vertical posts will still be usable. There are few things in life that are as frustrating as digging a new posthole.

If you are dealing with a situation where the cross members or pickets have rotted, but the vertical supports are fine, then simply invest in replacing those pieces.

If might require you to disassemble and reassemble a section of the fence, but it is an easier task than spending all day digging a couple of post holes.

Most fences are held together with nails. Our recommendation when repairing a damaged portion is that you perform the repairs with screws for added reinforcement. An impact driver allows you to drive the screws quickly, even into hardened 4x4 lumber.

Option #2: Add new Posts

If your vertical supports are wobbly, there is no alternative: you must install new posts. (Note: Before digging new holes, be sure to contact the proper authorities to make sure there are no buried cables that you might strike.

The challenge with digging new post holes is that your post hole diggers require some space to operate. There is no way to use them in close proximity to the fence without removing the old fence.

There have been suggestions to use a crowbar to dig the hole. This could work, but sounds even more arduous than using a posthole digger.

An easier method is to dig the hole about 2 inches away from the fence with a posthole digger, and then use a metal strap to bridge the gap.

After you get the hole about 2 feet deep, add the 4x4 post, and use a quick setting concrete to secure it. Using a level, ensure that the post is vertically level and allow it time to cure.

The next day, attach one edge of the metal strap to the fence. Working with a partner and some extra boards, you can force the fence into an upright position. The other end of the metal strap can then be attached to secure the fence into the upright position.

Fixing a leaning fence is an easy weekend task that increases the sellability of your house and prevents a total fence collapse.

Author

Random Articles

Has the Time Come to Revamp Your Family Bathroom?

If your family bathroom is looking a little worse for wear, you might be unsure about revamping it. The problem is that family life is expensive...

Kitchen / Bathrooms

How Safe is Fluoride in Your Water?

Fluoride started being added to American water supplies in the 1950s, in an attempt to improve dental health and reduce cavities in the general...

Plumbing / Basements

The Benefits of a Party Wall Award - Why You Need One

Last year, my husband and I decided that we were going to extend our house. We obtained all the planning permission from our local council and had...

Improvements / Remodeling

Fixing the Top 5 Most Common Plumbing Problems

When it comes to plumbing, you are bound to face some issues at a certain point of time. Trivial problems here and there will arise to niggle at...

Plumbing / Basements

Garden Water Features and Fish – Basic Tips You Should Know About

The secret to owning beautiful water features is a basic understanding of what happens to water when fish are placed in ponds or water gardens,...

Garden / Landscaping / Patio

Actions

Contact Us | Submit Article | 411homerepair © 2020