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Replacing Wood and Engineered Siding

by Insidespaces on May 7, 2012

Wood and Engineered sidings are good choices for siding that last a long time but do not tolerate water penetration very well. This usually becomes evident where the siding meets horizontal surfaces such as porches, steps and decks. Fortunately, it is fairly easy to replace. The biggest problem can be finding a replacement piece. The siding in this how to is a smooth engineered siding and is very easy to replace as it has no texture.

Step 1:

Determine the area that has to be removed to effect the repair. Engineered siding will swell up and fall apart and wood sidings will deteriorate, split or rot. Locate the nearest wall studs and mark the pieces of siding to be removed along the middle of these studs. One method for locating the studs is to find the nails that hold the siding to the house. Remember that studs are usually installed 16" on center.

Step 2:

Use a utility knife to score the paint where the rows of siding overlap as it will ease removal of the boards. This is especially important for engineered siding. Also, cut away any caulk that may be in the area.

Step 3:

If the piece of siding you want to remove is a whole piece then skip to Step 4. Otherwise, set the depth of cut on your circular saw to the same thickness as your siding. Cut along the lines your marked earlier. Your cuts will need to run into the course above the damaged course as the siding boards overlap some. If you are removing more than one course, you should stagger your cuts if possible.

Step 4:

Using a pry bar, loosen the course of siding above the repair area. Place a shim in between the courses to keep the siding away from the repair area. Using a reciprocating saw or (preferably) a hack saw blade, cut the nails in the above course that hold the damaged course.

Step 5:

Slide out the damaged course. Use a pry bar to remove the damaged siding if necessary. If there are stubborn pieces, a chisel will take care of it.

Step 6:

Inspect and repair any material behind the damaged siding. This might include sheathing, felt or a house-wrapping product.

Step 7:

Using the old siding as a pattern, cut the new siding to the proper dimensions. The new pieces should be about 1/16" shorter than the original to allow for expansion.

Step 8:

Prime the siding before you put it back on the house. Make sure that you use a good-quality exterior primer.

Step 9:

Slide the new siding back into place. If you have a tough time sliding the siding under, place a beater block against the bottom edge and drive it home. Using galvanized nails, secure the patch in place. Make sure that you nail into the studs. If you are replacing more than one course, start at the bottom.

Step 10:

Seal up any gaps or nail heads with a paintable exterior (www.dap.com) caulk. After the caulk cures, paint the repair area with exterior paint that is compatible with the primer you used.

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