411homerepair.com

Latest Articles

What are the Best-Rated Roofing Materials for Homeowner?

Finding the best exterior remodeling company is the first step towards becoming an excited homeowner. Roofing contractors will advise you on the...

on Aug 18, 2019

Tips for Carpet and Rug Cleaning when Living with Teenagers

Carpets and rugs are essential additions to the floor and homeowners are constantly looking for the best styles and designs to complement their...

on Aug 17, 2019

5 Things You Must Know Before Buying a New Home

Buying a new home is a huge step and a worthwhile investment. But the process isn’t easy as many people think. This lifetime decision...

on Aug 17, 2019

3 Ways to Prepare Your Lawn for Fall

The end of summer marks the beginning of your lawn fading from vibrant green to dormancy after Labor Day. But lawns require treatment and care as...

on Aug 16, 2019

How to Sell Your House Fast

You Have probably been wondering how can you sell your house fast. Maybe you have a property that you need to sell a house fast owing to financial...

on Aug 16, 2019

Home Asbestos Exposure: A Modern Menace or Just a Threat of the Past

by Tom Grant on Jul 16, 2015

Most people believe that asbestos is a thing of the past, but that’s not true. It’s used in many consumer products, from brake pads to reinforced concrete to everyday consumer items. Here’s what it means to you and what you can do about it.

What Is Asbestos?

Asbestos is a naturally occurring mineral that separates into strong, thin, fibers that are not visible to the naked eye. It became a commonly-used building material in the mid 1970s due to its strength, fire resistance and corrosion resistance. It’s also an excellent insulator.

It’s usually added to other materials to add strength to the base material, like concrete. It may be added to asphalt, vinyl materials in roof shingles, piping, siding, wall board, flooring tiles, and joint compounds. It may also be used in adhesives.

It can be used as fireproofing material, applied directly to steel beams and columns during the construction phase.

The material is so common that almost everyone in the U.S. has been exposed to it at some point.

When Does It Become A Problem?

Asbestos is not inherently dangerous, contrary to commonly-held opinions. It becomes dangerous when the tiny fibers become airborne, however. If the asbestos is in good condition and left undisturbed, it poses no risk to humans.

Once airborne, fibers can become lodged in the lungs for a long time and eventually can cause cancer through scaring and chronic low-grade inflammation.

This type of cancer affects the mesothelium - a thin tissue layer that lines the cavities and surrounds internal organs - and is appropriately named “mesothelioma.”

Working Around Asbestos

If at all possible, you should not work around asbestos unless you’ve been trained to do so and you have the proper safety gear. Likewise, you should not permit contractors to work in your home without proper asbestos training.

For example, if you are having a new HVAC unit installed, you should work with a professional that has installed many systems and has experience working around potentially hazardous materials.

Should You Remove It?

Removing asbestos should be a last resort. Most contractors and professionals in the construction and home repair industry will advise you to simply seal it up with a non-permeable layer and protect it from becoming airborne.

How To Remove It When Necessary

While keeping it in place is usually your best option, when it does have to be removed, you should use a special team of specialists for the job. This is most definitely not a DIY project, and there are many local and state regulations that control how asbestos can be removed and how it must be disposed of.

Since the fibers can become airborne and travel on the wind, improper removal could also endanger the lives of others, like neighbors. The National Emission Standards For Hazardous Air Pollutants (NESHAP) do not apply to privately owned homes and apartments with four or fewer units in them.

However, a licensed contractor should still do the job. Choose someone with experience and that knows all of the risks and safety procedures. 

Author

tomgrant0012

Tom Grant

Sponsored Articles

Random Articles

How to Buy and Resell Condos for Profit

Flipping condos can be a rewarding venture if you learn how to do it right. It basically involves buying condominiums at a discounted price and...

Real Estate / Finance

Roofing Warning Signs You Should be Aware Of

Your home is an investment - one of the biggest you will likely ever make. It makes sense then to ensure that your investment is taken care of,...

Roofing / Gutters

Building The Ideal Garage

It's amazing how far garages have come. In the early days of the American automobile, the vehicles were stored outdoors or in some other building...

Doors / Garages

How to Fund Your Home Improvement Project

Planning to have your home remodeled anytime soon? You better prepare for it financially. A good amount of money is needed to push through with a...

Real Estate / Finance

What is Dry Rot? (fungus disease)

Fungus diseases in wood are also known as dry rot or wet rot. This is caused by the growth of fungus in the wood. Wood-destroying fungi require a...

Cleaning / Maintenance

Actions

Contact Us | Submit Article | 411homerepair © 2019