411homerepair.com

Latest Articles

3 Things to Consider Before Building a New Home

Building a new home is definitely an exciting experience, but it’s also one of the biggest investments you will likely ever make.  In...

on Mar 19, 2019

Load Restraint Systems: Keeping the Roads Safe

It only takes a quick look at the number of accidents caused by trucks with unsecured loads to realise the importance of load restraint systems....

on Mar 18, 2019

7 Best ways to Get Rid of Old Furniture and Old Large Items

Is unwanted furniture taking up space in your attic? Or maybe you are moving, and the idea of transporting old furniture and appliances sickens...

on Mar 17, 2019

How Inclement Weather Can Affect Your Pool

Only a few months into 2019 and it has been the craziest winter on record for a number of years all across the country.  Heavy weather systems...

on Mar 11, 2019

Furnishing Your New Apartment on a Budget

`Moving into a new apartment is an exciting time. Perhaps it’s the first time you’ll be on your own, or you’re moving into your first place with a...

on Mar 6, 2019

Grading Landscapes - Part 3

by Dan Eskelson on Apr 30, 2012

Please also visit Part 1, Part 2 and Part 3 of this article.

We discussed basic soil work in a recent article, Equipment for Grading Landscapes Part 1 and Part 2, the extreme importance of soil quality to the success of your landscape justifies a few more thoughts. As I was working up one of my vegetable beds a few days ago, I was reminded of some of the lessons my father taught me many years ago.

He was a soil science major at the University of California, Berkeley. His masters thesis involved extensive experimentation with various natural and synthetic fertilizer combinations in both hydroponic (all water) and soil environments. The experiments produced tomatoes and other crops of almost any color, size and quality by varying the fertilizer type, amount and combination.

The results of these experiments concluded without a doubt that the largest, best tasting tomatoes were grown using a very simple fertilizer - namely, horse #$&*. Yes, plain old horse manure proved to be far superior than anything "modern" agriculture had come up with to that date.

I have read that very similar results have been obtained in recent controlled experiments, and in my own gardens have observed that natural soil amendments are far superior to those produced synthetically.

The large synthetic fertilizer companies have long tried to convince us that we need byproducts of the petrochemical industry to fertilize our plants - don't believe it. Centuries old natural fertilization methods and materials are still the most effective.

Proponents of chemical fertilizers will argue that the same basic nutrients (i.e. nitrogen, phosphorus, potassium, etc.) are supplied by chemical products. This is quite true - but the essential difference is that only natural materials supply the all important humic acids, beneficial bacteria and other microbial life essential to both the vitality of the plant and its ability to assimilate basic nutrients.

Healthy soil is not an inert, lifeless substance - it's full of microscopic life forms which are essential for the development of plant life. Synthetic fertilizers and pesticides not only do not add to this microbial life, in many cases they destroy it.

We could make further arguments for natural soil improvement by citing studies which document the pollution resulting from runoff of highly soluble synthetic products. Even the turfgrass industry, which supports the cultivation of huge acreages of monocultured crops (golf courses), has begun working to encourage the use of natural, soil-building materials and methods.

So, the next time your garden "expert", TV commercial, or retailer encourages you to buy petrochemical-based fertilizers, ask for the natural alternatives. There are an increasing number of these products, ranging from bulk compost to bagged products formulated from natural sources. Some are indeed more expensive, initially, than their synthetic counterparts, but their slow release and soil building qualities actually make them more cost effective.

OK, perhaps this has been enough about soil management. In the next issue, we'll move on to another topic. Just one more time...healthy soil grows healthy plants.

Please also visit Making the Grade Part 1 and Part 2 of this Article.

Dan Eskelson @ Clearwater Landscapes, Inc.

Author

Most Recent Articles

Sponsored Articles

Random Articles

How to Choose the Right Wooden Blinds for Your Home

Wooden blinds are yet to become popular among homeowners across the world but this is only reasoned by its luxurious appeal and a bit of...

Windows / Siding

Choosing a Shade Sail for Your Outdoor Space

Shade sails are large swaths of fabric installed high above a sunny space to create shade. Since Egyptian times, shade sails have been used to make...

Garden / Landscaping / Patio

5 Safety Precautions You Should Know Before Your DIY Home Renovation

Many people do not realize all of the dangers that are present when they take on a renovation project for their home. There are a number of hazards...

Safety / Security

Respirator or Dust Mask - What is the Difference?

When embarking on any project whatsoever where you will be subjected to airborne particles, you may want to make sure to have the appropriate level...

Cleaning / Maintenance

Indoor Environmental Quality (IEQ) and Health Effects of Air Pollution

Employers, whether building owners or tenants, have found that dissatisfaction with the indoor environment can lead to a host of employee problems,...

HVAC / Air Conditioning

Actions

Contact Us | Submit Article | 411homerepair © 2019