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Why Have ADUs Gotten So Popular?

There is a good reason why ADUs have become so popular over the last few years. Building an ADU is a great way to get more value and use out of...

on Sep 22, 2021

Why Plumbing is a Good Career

Think back to when you were a kid. How many times were you asked, “What do you want to be when you grow up?” Probably quite a bit. In...

on Sep 19, 2021

11 Steps to Take to Prepare Your Home for the Rainy Season

11 Steps To Take To Prepare Your Home For The Rainy Season Most regions that are closer to the equator have a rainy season each year. Beginning...

on Sep 16, 2021

Best Ways to Improve Your Home

Improving your home can be one of the things you are looking to do. Whether you believe this improvement can come from adding a new conservatory to...

on Sep 15, 2021

3 Tips for Keeping Your Garden in Good Shape

Looking after your garden can take more than just a single afternoon, especially if the weather has been unpredictable, or it has been left for an...

on Sep 14, 2021

Why do I have Moisture on my Windows?

by Michigan State University on Apr 26, 2012

Your humidistat is set too high if excessive moisture collects on windows and other cold surfaces. Excess humidity for a prolonged time can damage walls especially when outdoor air temperatures are very low. Excess moisture condenses on window glass because the glass is cold. Other sources of excess moisture besides overuse of a humidifier may be long showers, running water for other uses, boiling or steaming in cooking, plants, and drying clothes indoors.

A tight, energy-efficient house holds more moisture inside; you may need to run a kitchen or bath ventilating fan sometimes or open a window briefly. Storm windows and caulking around windows keep the interior glass warmer and reduce condensation of moisture there.

Humidifiers are not recommended for use in buildings without proper vapor barriers because of potential damage from moisture buildup. Consult a building contractor to determine the adequacy of the vapor barrier in your house. Use a humidity indicator to measure the relative humidity in your house. The American Society of Heating and Air Conditioning Engineers (ASHRAE) recommends these maximum indoor humidity levels.

Outdoor Recommended Indoor

Temperature Relative Humidity
+20 F. 35%
+10 F 30%
0 F. 25%
-10 F. 20%
-20 F. 15%
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