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4 Common Bathroom Plumbing Problems

The plumbing is one of those silent features that never makes its presence apparent, until the day something goes wrong with it. The most common...

on Sep 20, 2019

How Heat Can Damage Your Roof

Your roof is the most important place of your house. Throughout the years, it protects your property from intense heat, cold temperatures, heavy...

on Sep 13, 2019

What are the Differences Between Household and Business Waste?

Skip hires are easy-to-use, convenient, and dependable whether for domestic or for business purposes. If you are not sure whether you need a skip...

on Sep 12, 2019

4 Professional Home Plumbing Tips and Ideas You Must Know About

It can be a relief to own your own home instead of an apartment. There is no rent to pay, you can decorate your home how you like, and you do not...

on Sep 12, 2019

When Should I Replace My Air Conditioner?

Like everything else, an air conditioner doesn’t last forever. The average air conditioning system lasts as long as 15 years, depending on...

on Sep 12, 2019

Why do I have Moisture on my Windows?

by Michigan State University on Apr 26, 2012

Your humidistat is set too high if excessive moisture collects on windows and other cold surfaces. Excess humidity for a prolonged time can damage walls especially when outdoor air temperatures are very low. Excess moisture condenses on window glass because the glass is cold. Other sources of excess moisture besides overuse of a humidifier may be long showers, running water for other uses, boiling or steaming in cooking, plants, and drying clothes indoors. A tight, energy efficient house holds more moisture inside; you may need to run a kitchen or bath ventilating fan sometimes, or open a window briefly. Storm windows and caulking around windows keep the interior glass warmer and reduce condensation of moisture there.

Humidifiers are not recommended for use in buildings without proper vapor barriers because of potential damage from moisture buildup. Consult a building contractor to determine the adequacy of the vapor barrier in your house. Use a humidity indicator to measure the relative humidity in your house. The American Society of Heating and Air Conditioning Engineers (ASHRAE) recommends these maximum indoor humidity levels.

Outdoor Recommended Indoor

Temperature Relative Humidity
+20 F. 35%
+10 F 30%
0 F. 25%
-10 F. 20%
-20 F. 15%
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