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Are You Planning a Home Refurbishment? Read This

A home refurbishment is a challenging project to undertake. If you’re considering it, keep a few things in mind. Who is to do it? How much should...

on Jan 15, 2018

Adding a Bean Bag Chair Can Create a Certain Ambiance in Your Home

Home improvement involves numerous tasks that can enhance the look of your home and increase its value. Even redecorating or updating a room can...

on Jan 9, 2018

The Carpet Cleaning Guide to Dry Wet Carpets

We all face carpet cleaning situations when we really need a guide to help us to get through the situation. One of these situations is when the...

on Jan 5, 2018

Save Some Money and Fix that Window Yourself

A window is more than just something visual that can tie a room or home together. There’s also an important practical component to having a proper...

on Jan 3, 2018

Top 5 Reasons to Buy Venetian Blinds

Window treatment is not as easy as it sounds. You have to consider so many things- the dimensions of the room, the price of the window treatment,...

on Dec 28, 2017

Why do I have Moisture on my Windows?

by Michigan State University on Apr 26, 2012

Your humidistat is set too high if excessive moisture collects on windows and other cold surfaces. Excess humidity for a prolonged time can damage walls especially when outdoor air temperatures are very low. Excess moisture condenses on window glass because the glass is cold. Other sources of excess moisture besides overuse of a humidifier may be long showers, running water for other uses, boiling or steaming in cooking, plants, and drying clothes indoors. A tight, energy efficient house holds more moisture inside; you may need to run a kitchen or bath ventilating fan sometimes, or open a window briefly. Storm windows and caulking around windows keep the interior glass warmer and reduce condensation of moisture there.

Humidifiers are not recommended for use in buildings without proper vapor barriers because of potential damage from moisture buildup. Consult a building contractor to determine the adequacy of the vapor barrier in your house. Use a humidity indicator to measure the relative humidity in your house. The American Society of Heating and Air Conditioning Engineers (ASHRAE) recommends these maximum indoor humidity levels.

Outdoor Recommended Indoor

Temperature Relative Humidity
+20 F. 35%
+10 F 30%
0 F. 25%
-10 F. 20%
-20 F. 15%
Windows / Siding 1738 Views

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