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Top Home Exterior Repairs and Projects to Tackle in Spring 2019

As most of us are buckling down for a long winter season, it may be that your thoughts are elsewhere and you could in fact be looking ahead to next...

on Dec 12, 2018

Benefits of Adding Retaining Walls to Your Lawn

Retaining walls play an integral part in supporting your lawn’s foundation and landscape. It can provide both practical and aesthetic value...

on Dec 8, 2018

Five Ways to Fund Your Property Purchase

Property purchases can be funded in a variety of ways. Whether you are looking to buy a home or a commercial property of any kind, it’s worth...

on Dec 7, 2018

3 Things to know before Hiring a Moving Company

Do you plan on hiring a moving company to move your home? We are going to cover 3 things you should carefully look over before choosing a...

on Dec 6, 2018

How Gutter Guards Keep Out Leaves and Those Annoying Little Critters

Though a gutter guard doesn’t make your gutter system completely maintenance-free, it does reduce the amount of maintenance you’ll need...

on Nov 21, 2018

Why do I have Moisture on my Windows?

by Michigan State University on Apr 26, 2012

Your humidistat is set too high if excessive moisture collects on windows and other cold surfaces. Excess humidity for a prolonged time can damage walls especially when outdoor air temperatures are very low. Excess moisture condenses on window glass because the glass is cold. Other sources of excess moisture besides overuse of a humidifier may be long showers, running water for other uses, boiling or steaming in cooking, plants, and drying clothes indoors. A tight, energy efficient house holds more moisture inside; you may need to run a kitchen or bath ventilating fan sometimes, or open a window briefly. Storm windows and caulking around windows keep the interior glass warmer and reduce condensation of moisture there.

Humidifiers are not recommended for use in buildings without proper vapor barriers because of potential damage from moisture buildup. Consult a building contractor to determine the adequacy of the vapor barrier in your house. Use a humidity indicator to measure the relative humidity in your house. The American Society of Heating and Air Conditioning Engineers (ASHRAE) recommends these maximum indoor humidity levels.

Outdoor Recommended Indoor

Temperature Relative Humidity
+20 F. 35%
+10 F 30%
0 F. 25%
-10 F. 20%
-20 F. 15%
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